SYSTEMATIC OBSERVATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT IN KINDERGARTEN BY PROSPECTIVE EDUCATORS

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Published: 2020-04-24

Page: 67-73


MARINA SOUNOGLOU *

Department of Early Childhood Education, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Thessaly, Argonafton & Filellinon, 38221, Volos, Greece.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Systematic observation is an alternative form of assessment which is used to evaluate infant development. Prospective educators use the systematic observation in their internship. This is the basic way of assessing infants using observation guides in the kindergarten area, in order to observe the behavior of infants between to classmates and adults, the action of infants during the breaks, leisure activities and organized activities. The sample of survey consists of 184 students of the 2nd year in the School of Early Childhood Education of the University of Thessaly during the academic year 2018-2019. The methodology that was used was the qualitative discourse analysis of the student evaluations minutes. The conclusions indicate the effectiveness of systematic observation in the evaluation of all-round development of infants, with major preferred techniques of check list and short reports due to inexperience and scarce time. Finally, analyzing the needs, the constraints and the perspectives that reflected by the survey, it is proposed a holistic approach to the assessment by systematic observation of infants.

Keywords: Systematic observation, alternative assessment, kindergarten, internship.


How to Cite

SOUNOGLOU, M. (2020). SYSTEMATIC OBSERVATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT IN KINDERGARTEN BY PROSPECTIVE EDUCATORS. Asian Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Studies, 2(2), 67–73. Retrieved from https://ikprress.org/index.php/AJAHSS/article/view/5023

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