Improving the Beta-carotene Content of Carrots through Process Optimization

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Published: 2023-09-29

DOI: 10.56557/jafsat/2023/v10i48398

Page: 34-41


Sylvester N. Orjiakor *

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Chika U. Obiora

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Eunice N. Ezembu

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Sunday K. Okocha

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Clement C. Ezegbe

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Mary C. Ezeh

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Goodness C. Orjika

Department of Food Science and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Response surface methodology was used to optimize the process conditions (blanching and drying) on the beta-carotene content of carrots. Carrots were washed, peeled, diced, blanched and dried at various temperature ranges. The nutritional composition of the fresh and dried samples was determined using standard methods. A three-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used to study the effects of blanching time (X1), blanching temperature (X2) and drying temperature (X3) on the beta-carotene content of carrot. Fourteen experimental combinations were produced with six replicates at the centre point to generate twenty (20) runs. The carrot was blanched at a temperature range of 60-800C for 2-5 minutes and dried at a temperature ranging between 50-700C. The result obtained indicated that the beta-carotene content of fresh carrot was 5738 µg. The processed carrots ranged from 2478 µg to 1060 µg. It was observed that carrot processed for 2 mins (blanching time), at 800C (blanching temperature) and 500C (dryingtemperature) produced the highest beta-carotene. The experimental data was fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis and the quadratic model was highly significant (p<0.05).

Keywords: Response surface, beta-carotene, optimize, blanching, carrot


How to Cite

Orjiakor , S. N., Obiora , C. U., Ezembu , E. N., Okocha , S. K., Ezegbe , C. C., Ezeh , M. C., & Orjika , G. C. (2023). Improving the Beta-carotene Content of Carrots through Process Optimization. Journal of Advances in Food Science & Technology, 10(4), 34–41. https://doi.org/10.56557/jafsat/2023/v10i48398

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