MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL COLONIES ISOLATED FROM THE PNEUMATOPHORE OF THE MANGROVE PLANT Avicennia officinalis

Main Article Content

R. R. DEVI
V. S. SUGUNAN
SUSHA DAYANANDAN

Abstract

Pneumatophores of mangrove plants are biodiversity “hotspots” of microfauna, harbouring epiphytic and endophytic symbionts. This study is aimed at isolating and identifying endophytic bacteria from the pneumatophores of the mangrove plant Avicennia officinalis, from the mangrove ecosystem of Poovar, South Kerala, India. The pneumatophore endosphere was visualised using Scanning Electron Microscopy and mineral composition was determined using Energy Dispersive X–ray Analysis (EDAX). Endophytic colonies were isolated from the extract of surface sterilized pneumatophore samples and four bacterial colonies with distinct colony morphology but atypical biochemical pattern were propagated in pure culture and their 16srRNAs were sequenced and aligned with standard genomic sequences for taxon assignment. The colonies isolated were identified as Pseudomonas alcaligenes (PMB1) and Aeromonas taiwanensis (PMB3 & PMB4). The sequence data of the isolate encoded PMB2 had less than 95% similarity with the standard 16S rRNA sequences available in GenBank and the novel sequence was deposited in the NCBI Library under the accession number MT 671484. The occurrence of novel genomes, the identification of Pseudomonas alcaligenes with bioremedial potential and Aeromonas taiwanensis with antibiotic resistance plasmids from the pneumatophore of Avicennia officinalis throw light into this hithero unexplored hidden treasure of novel yet- to- be- cultured bacteria within the sequestrated microhabitats of mangrove ecosystems. The study emphasise the need of further investigations        in this aspect to fully exploit the beneficial biotechnological potential of pneumatophore endobacteria. 

Keywords:
Pneumatophore, endophytic, mangrove, bacteria.

Article Details

How to Cite
DEVI, R. R., SUGUNAN, V. S., & DAYANANDAN, S. (2020). MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL COLONIES ISOLATED FROM THE PNEUMATOPHORE OF THE MANGROVE PLANT Avicennia officinalis. PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 21(55-56), 33-42. Retrieved from https://ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5588
Section
Original Research Article

References

Duke NC. Mangrove floristics and biogeography. Tropical Mangrove Ecosystems; 1992.

Bashan Y, Holguin G. Plant growth-promoting bacteria: A potential tool for arid mangrove reforestation. Trees. 2002;16(2-3):159-166.

Sona Janarthine SR, Eganathan P, Balasubramanian T, Vijayalakshmi S. Endophytic bacteria isolated from the pneumatophores of Avicennia marina. African Journal of Microbiology Research. 2011;5(26):4455-4466.

Hossain ML. Medicinal activity of Avicennia officinalis: Evaluation of phytochemical and pharmacological properties. Saudi J. Med. Pharm. Sci. 2016; 2:250-255.

sona Janarthine SR, Eganathan P, Balasubramanian T, Vijayalakshmi S. Endophytic bacteria isolated from the pneumatophores of Avicennia marina. African Journal of Microbiology Research. 2011;5(26):4455-4466.

Loganathachetti DS, Sadaiappan B, Poosakkannu A, Muthuraman S. Pyrosequencing-based seasonal observation of prokaryotic diversity in pneumatophore-associated soil of Avicennia marina. Current Microbiology. 2016;72(1):68-74.

Thatoi H, Samantaray D, Das SK. The genus Avicennia, a pioneer group of dominant mangrove plant species with potential medicinal values: A review. Frontiers in Life Science. 2016;9(4):267-291.

Young CC. Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology; 1926.

Sona Janarthine SR, Eganathan P, Balasubramanian T, Vijayalakshmi S. Endophytic bacteria isolated from the pneumatophores of Avicennia marina. African Journal of Microbiology Research. 2011;5(26):4455-4466.

Senthilraj R, Prasad GS, Janakiraman K.. Sequence-based identification of microbial contaminants in non-parenteral products. Brazilian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2016;52(2):329-336.

Palys T, Nakamura LK, Cohan FM. Discovery and classification of ecological diversity in the bacterial world: The role of DNA sequence data. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 1997;47(4):1145-1156.

Drancourt M, Bollet C, Carlioz A, Martelin R, Gayral JP, Raoult D. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis of a large collection of environmental and clinical unidentifiable bacterial isolates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2000;38(10):3623-3630.

Pianetti A, Battistelli M, Citterio B, Parlani C, Falcieri E, Bruscolini F. Morphological changes of Aeromonas hydrophila in response to osmotic stress. Micron. 2009; 40(4):426-433.

Kumar M, Lakshmi CV, Khanna S. Microbial biodiversity and in situ bioremediation of endosulfan contaminated soil. Indian Journal of Microbiology. 2008; 48(1):128-133.

Menn F, Easter JP, Sayler GS. 21 Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Bioremediation. Knoxville, TN. 1999; 37996-1605.

Reda AB. Bacterial bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy oil contaminated soil. Journal of Applied Sciences Research. 2009;197-201.

Alperi A, Martínez-Murcia AJ, Ko WC, Monera A, Saavedra MJ, Figueras MJ. Aeromonas taiwanensis sp. nov. and Aeromonas sanarellii sp. nov., clinical species from Taiwan. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 2010;60(9):2048-205.

Větrovský T, Baldrian P. The variability of the 16S rRNA gene in bacterial genomes and its consequences for bacterial community analyses. PloS One. 2013;8(2), e57923.

El Zahar Haichar F, Marol C, Berge O, Rangel-Castro JI, Prosser JI, Balesdent J, Achouak W. Plant host habitat and root exudates shape soil bacterial community structure. The ISME Journal. 2008;2(12): 1221-1230.