SAFETY EVALUATION OF WEST AFRICAN ALKALINE FERMENTED FOODS

Main Article Content

AFOLAKE ATINUKE OLANBIWONINU
OMOLOLU EBENEZER FAGUNWA

Abstract

In West Africa, alkaline fermented foods play a major role in the diet of the populace. These products which are usually obtained from seeds rich in protein are often used as food condiments to enhance food flavor and taste or as meat/fish substitutes. The main biochemical reaction that takes place during the fermentation is proteolysis, which leads to the release of peptides and essential amino acids in the products. The degradation of the amino acids is liable for a rise of the product pH to alkaline values of 8–10. It is generally recognized that alkaline fermentation produces safe products because of the alkalinity that makes it rather difficult for microorganisms, which might otherwise cause spoilage of the product to grow. However, these products have sometimes involved the risk of food-borne diseases because of the method for its preparation, quality of fermentation process, and use of local non-sterile utensils. Identifying the associated safety issues could be an essential prerequisite for improving risk management and supply of healthy food. Here, different alkaline fermented foods of West Africa were discussed with respect to safety during pre-fermentation, fermentation, and post-fermentation. Despite the nutritional richness and probiotics potentials of alkaline fermented foods of West Africa origin, there are still safety concerns that may be tackled by good practices, monitoring and evaluation, and food regulation.

Keywords:
Fermentation, alkaline, fermented foods, microorganism, food safety, West Africa, probiotics.

Article Details

How to Cite
OLANBIWONINU, A. A., & FAGUNWA, O. E. (2021). SAFETY EVALUATION OF WEST AFRICAN ALKALINE FERMENTED FOODS. Journal of Advances in Food Science & Technology, 7(1), 26-37. Retrieved from https://ikprress.org/index.php/JAFSAT/article/view/5915
Section
Review Articles

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